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20110701
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business with the united states that is making a very big profit. china is going to make $300 billion on us at least this year. and they just revised that recently, i don't know if you saw. they said those numbers are going to be low. so we have to take our country back. >> what do you think of this gang of six plan? do you think it's workable from what you've seen? >> from what i've seen, nobody really knows exactly what it represents and what it is yet. but at least they're in there pitches and trying to make the big deal. the big deal is really the deal they should make. i don't like the punt. i don't like the deal where we kick it down the road for six months. this is the time to make the deal. and i have to tell you, the republicans have the cards. people might not think that, but the republicans have all of the cards. and this is the time to get rid of obama care. this is the time to make the great deal. >> i've been following you on twitter and you've been aggressive about obama on the economy. you believe he can't stop spending and that america has to stop spending. one of his belie
been a big hit in london "evita" here had bad reviews. the mood changed. funny enough, i think that's an intriguing one because in the late '70s america was a little bit in denial about talking about anything political. i mean, you remember the time, after vietnam, and i remember writing the early days of the "evita" run we hit the -- at the same time of the russian invasion of afghanistan, which i don't think anybody really completely understood what was going on. for give me for talking about afghanistan. i've gone off on a tangent. >> another time. >> suddenly people started talking about politics again. they said, maybe paralleled with what we were trying to say there was an interesting subject. >> how much have the critics gotten to you over the years? >> i don't really care very much if i don't think the critics really understand music. >> somebody that you respect, what is the most hurtful kind of thing they could say that would really get to you? >> i guess somebody who i did respect as a musician said that the score was humdrum or something, then i would be sad if i believe
have a big stake in is apple, of course. steve jobs has done an extraordinary job there. their recent profits were just astronomical again. obviously, they're a big global company, and they've aggressively marketed in countries all over the world. do you think america's doing enough of that? do you think it's time they went back to designing, creating, and building things they can sell to the world exactly as apple is doing so successfully? >> well, clearly, apple is a role model of the american innovation whereby it produced all these products -- ipod, iphone, ipad -- that is really now dominating all the technology arena in the world. clearly, apple is a role model, and i believe the united states, with all its problems, is down but for sure is not out. i hope that an awakening happens in the united states whereby to go back to the roots of the main success of america, which is innovation and encouraging more ideas and more thoughts to be integrated in the u.s. system. >> are you concerned at all about the succession plans at apple given the ongoing situation involving steve jobs' h
. >> yes. i think, although "evita" was a big hit in london. "evita" when it opened here had pretty bad reviews. then the mood sort of changed. i think that's an intriguing one because in the kind of late '70s america was a little bit in denial about talking about anything political. you remember the time. after vietnam, after everything and i remember writing in the early days of the "evita" run we hit the -- same time of the russian invasion of afghanistan which nobody understood what was going on. i'm going off on a tangent. it changed -- suddenly people started to talk about politics again and said well maybe eva peron and what we were trying to say there was an interesting subject. >> how much did the critics get to you over the years? >> i didn't care very much if i don't think that the critics understand music. >> but somebody you respect, what's the most hurtful kind of thing that they would say that would get to you. >> somebody who i did respect as a musician said that the score was humdrum or something then i would be sad if i believed in the score. there are always going to
an audience and walk off an hour and a half later with a big check in your pockets. movies, it's three months filming, six months editing, promotion, the whole rest of it. it might just bomb overnight. a torturous process. >> and it is monotonous. some directors have you do things 20 or 30 times in a row. if you started in comedy, that's rough because you wear out. but in the end, if you're working with great people, i just did a movie with dax shepherd and barry cooper and kristin bell, every day it was something different for those guys and fun. i see the joy of somebody like bradl bradly cooper has to be there. just so happy to be in the moment and i want to get some of that. i've done about 100 movies and i want it still to be fun for me. >> you've done 100 movies. >> yeah. >> which is your favorite? >> i love "true lies" because what have it did personally. >> the biggest turkey? the one you don't like to talk about in civilized company? >> the financier's girlfriend played the lead. i took it, it was a job. i don't turn down much, obviously. but it was a job and it was rough to put her
content to -- when the "daily telegraph" broke a very big story about the abuses on mps' expenses and obtained this information by paying for it, paying for stolen documents, what he was trying to point out, he created a culture there to expose the establishment. and clearly what we saw today was the beginning of a process which needs to draw a line between exposing and making a democracy transparent which is good, and tampering with the law and doing illegal things and describing police, which is clearly very, very bad. but it was apparent that he wasn't -- >> let me bring in james fallows on that point. what was interesting watching it, i saw people observing the murdochs seemed to be a bit mumbling. this reminded me of the meetings i had with him 16 years ago. when he warmed up, he was the murdoch of old. i expect when he started, he was very conscious of not saying the wrong thing and that is why he was taking time to answer. what's interesting to me, he made it clear he didn't feel the buck stopped with him is that a position that's acceptable for a guy who is chairman and ce
. >> translator: compared to other countries, i will not say that we have a big problem with right-wing extremists in norway, but we have had some groups, and we have followed them before, and our police is aware that there are some right-wing extreme groups, or at least has been some groups of that kind in norway. but, again, i very much underline that we will not speculate and we will await the investigation from the police before we say anything more about this particular case, but it's part of our work, and the police follow this kind of right wing extreme groups. >> the police admitted the suspect was not previously known to them. a spokesperson revealed what was known about him so far. >> he is a free mason, and we cannot provide further details or specifics on this guy. this guy has not been on the police radar it seems. >> the scale of the attack is only just becoming clear. 84 people are now confirmed dead, and the massacre at utoya island, where the suspect opened fire with an automatic weapon. it was aimed at a camp for young people. some people jumped into freezing waters to try and es
will come in the end and soon. >> president obama obviously inherited by common consent a big hospital pass in terms of the state of the economy, not just in america but around the world, very very tough to pull out of any kind of rapid way. having said that, as we head towards another election year, there will be critics and you will have heard them, that say you can't keep blaming the republicans for what you inherited. president obama, under his administration, the jobless figures are still terrible, 9.2% of americans are out of work. do you feel disappointed that there's been no greater inroad into those jobless figures? >> i feel very disappointed there hasn't been more inroad into those jobless figures. i feel disappointed frankly there hasn't been more bipartisan bipartisan cooperation on solutions. here in massachusetts, we have like states across the country faced huge unprecedented budget gaps, taking that same balanced approach with cuts and use of stimulus reserves and modest tax increases and change in the way a lot of our state government does business, we have closed a $14 bi
our military is too big. by the way, people call it this military, hands off. it's not military. it's defense contractors, welfare for people who make weapons that we don't need. most of our weaponry is ridiculous. it's for fighting the russians in 1978. we don't need that. what would make this country stronger is economics. that's where the future is. that's what makes a country strong. if you're not strong economically, you're not going to be- >> that's where america is increasingly weak by comparison. >> this is one reason. we could solve this debt deficit problem if we do two simple things. tax the rich like they were taxed, not a hell of a lot more, just like under clinton. and bring the troops home. not just from iraq and afghanistan but we have a half a million troops on bases. >> how many do chinese have? >> none, i don't think. >> may have hardly anything, they have no imperialistic ambition. >> this is not the way you achieve it in this world. not the 14th century. >> i was in shanghai. this dinism you felt. this young millionaire, 125,000 millionaires in shanghai. he said
wendy's own romantic past raised some eyebrows including a former marriage and then big reports of wendy's sometimes strained relationship with murdoch's other children. but as the pie man found, nothing comes between the slapdown sister and her mister. stan grant, cnn, beijing. >> and that is it for "in the arena." we'll be back next week. pierce morgan is ahead. but first -- we're following up on important breaking news tonight. a 32-year-old norwegian man is in custody after today's deadly twin attacks in norway. the death toll is now 17. seven were killed in oslo where a bomb blasted through the center. outside the capital, a gunman opened fire on a political meeting of young people killing ten there. the attacks with definitely linked. 90 people are hospitalized with injuries in oslo. no word yet on a motive for the attacks. and the other huge story in washington, debt talks and broken down. late this afternoon house speaker john boehner walked out of negotiations with president obama saying the two could not connect because of their difference visions for country. presiden
disingenuous from somebody else. that's a pretty big chip to pull out. and i disagreed with that. and we -- >> what do you mean by that, do you think? >> i think when you understand the material, you understand it. and when you don't get it, you might think that i'm negative towards my own people. >> also strikes me as strange. i've met jay leno, five or six times on his show. he's always been unbelievable courteous. comes back, chat, cup of coffee, have a laugh and yet he seems to attract, from all of his competitors, extraordinary amount of antipathy. >> there's not a -- there's not a union of super heroes amongst late night talk show hosts. i just met david letterman really for the first time i did his show. i waited 28 years to do it. i've known conan for a while. i know jimmy kimmel, craig ferguson. to a man, i think one thing we agree on is we're all not crazy about jay leno. >> why is that? >> i don't know. i think in our own personal dealings, some people get along and some people don't. >> is he much more competitive than people realized, do you think? >> i don't -- you know, i
compromise. even though we have had big disputes over the years, there's been a situation where parties work together for things that have to happen. i know people around the country are frustrated and angry. the president shares that frustration. it's why the phone lines are jammed on the hill. e-mails and websites are going down because people don't understand why compromise is a dirty word in this town. >> how much responsibility does the white house take for the current economy. there comes a point when blaming george bush no longer holds water. when you look at the credit rating coming down, how much blame are you guys taking in that? >> what the president has said is we didn't get into this mess overnight and we are not going to get out overnight. the president inherited financial challenges. we are working to get out of it. the president said the recovery is happening, but not fast enough. we are not creating enough jobs, the economy is not working. if we are going to have a real solution, it has to be republicans and democrats working together. it's pushing them to get the debt fight
themselves as kind of big part actors because they're being beamed to the worldment and wherever you have seen the tril trials by television now involving notorious people, the results normally got wrong way to public opinion. and create -- >> i don't know what you just said. >> take o.j. simpson case. >> goes the wrong way to public opinion. what does that mean? >> that means that public opinion had been driven, i think, by the saturation and coverage on television and all the commentary so that most people were directed to believe and, you know, i'm sure you wouldn't deny the fact you were directly able to think this that this woman killed her child. >> actually, i have a lot more respect for my viewers. i think they can make up their own minds. and also it's funny that you would say that. because in our constitution, i guess you can compare it to the legislative history, the legislative minutes when laws are enacted in our country. someone is taking down everything that's being said as laws are passed by congress. we had something similar to that when the constitution was written. and
not have reported immediately their child missing. so there are some very big unanswered questions here, aren't there? >> you are so right, piers, and everybody in america and all over the world who are following this know that in their gut, in their heart of hearts. people are upset about this verdict. why? because the evidence, the circumstantial evidence surrounding the killing or the death of this child, which before and after only points to one person, that is her mother, is enough sh would have been enough for a reasonable jury in my opinion to have come back with a guilty verdict, because remember scott peterson. that's a case that was entirely circumstantial, and guess what? they came up with guilty and death for that killer. and i think people feel cheated. i think the justice system in america feels -- many people feel it's been broken. i can tell you on the streets in orlando there are people who were screaming "we don't want a killer on our streets," and that was happening at the same time mr. jose baez is celebrating a champagne toast inside the restaurant across the street
you that you could save hundreds! yeah, that'll certainly stick with me. we'll take it. go, big money! i mean, go. it's your break, honey. same coverage, more savings. now, that's progressive. call or click today. a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... for greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impossible to say. and i count on social security. here's what i'm not... a pushover. right now, some in washington want to make a deal cutting the social security and medicare benefits we worked for. with billions in waste and loopholes, how could they look at us? maybe we seem like an easy target... until you realize... there are 50 million of us. [ female announcer ] tell the politicians: cut waste and loopholes, not our benefits. with n
. our country is not succeeding because our military is too big. people call it the military and then it's hands off. it's not military. it's defense contractors. most of our weaponry is ridiculous. it's not -- it's for fighting the russians in 1978. we don't need that. what would make this country stronger is economics. that's where the future is. that's what makes a country strong. if you're not strong economically you are not -- >> piers: that's where america is increasingly weak. >> this is one reason. we could solve this debt deficit problem if we would do two simple things. tax the rich like they used to be taxed. not a hell of a lot more, just like they were under clinton and bring the troops home. not just from iraq and afghanistan, but we have half a million troops in bases across the world. >> piers: how many do the chinese have? >> none. they don't have troops. because they know this is not the way you achieve agemny in this world. >> piers: i did a documentary in shanghai recently. fascinating time to be out there. this dynamism that you felt along the city. one frosting youn
forefathers, openly discussed, piers, how they wanted every courtroom in america to be big enough for the entire community to hear the trial. so there is no closed-door justice or secret proceedings. the people that watched this trial, including myself, made their decision, just because it doesn't agree with the jury's decision is a whole other can of worms. but america can listen and hear and evaluate the evidence, just as well as you and i can. so that was their decision. i'm sure you saw the "usa today" poll that 2/3 of americans believe they are guilty. that's their right to have an opinion and voice it. >> nancy, when we come back, i want to talk to you about your days as a prosecutor, and the tragedy that you already referred to that led you to becoming a lawyer in the first place. [ male announcer ] this...is the network -- a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliv
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)

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